The Luck of the Irish

As the snow melts and mud mars our paths, celebrate the abiding green of Ireland!  St. Patrick, the lucky of the Irish, and the wisdom of their sages are all a story away.  These are all K-4 classics.

 

patrick

 

Patrick, Patron Saint of Ireland. Tomie dePaola. 
Holiday House, 1994. 

 

Tomie dePaola’s lively historical biography is a good introduction to Ireland’s legendary saint and hero commemorated on March 17th.  We follow Patrick’s life from his kidnapping and enslavement as a youngster, to his escape from slavery, then his return to Irish shores as a bishop.  DePaola nicely separates fact from legend, and artfully renders his work in bold green, moss and earth tones.

 

finnFinn McCool and the Great Fish.Eve Bunting.
Illustrated by Zachary Pullen.  Sleeping Bear Press, 2011.  

 

Eve Bunting, who is Irish herself, tells this whimsical tale of a gentle giant who is extraordinarily helpful, but not terribly bright (something of “turnip head”) seeking wisdom from an old man who knows it source.  Lyrical, charming and beautifully illustrated.

 

Jamie O’Rourke and the Big Potato.  Tomie dePaola.
Puffin 1997.

 

Irish humor and the lilt of Irish laughter are all over this silly book, in which a lazy Irish farmer learns to be careful of what he wishes for!

 

Fiona’s Luck.  Teresa Bateman.  Illustrated by Kelly Murphy.  Charlesbridge Publishing, 2009.

 

Cleanly, cleverly illustrated and magically narrated, this is the unlikely tale of a time when “the big folk” were using up all the luck in Ireland, and the King of leprechauns decides to squirrel what remains away in a trunk.  Beset by hard times (the potato famine!), the Irish now suffer, and a resourceful Fiona sets out to recover luck from the leprechauns.  Quick thinking, she makes her own luck in a charming and charmed tale.

 

 

 


Each month on the Core Virtues website, we feature the life of a hero or heroine – men and women who have tirelessly pursued excellence in their lives and helped improve the lives of others. We tie each month’s biography to the virtue of the month or to a theme suggested by the particular time of the year.

March

Compassion, Faithfulness and MercyBarton

Clara Barton (1821-1912)

Founder of the American Red Cross

“I have an almost complete disregard of precedent and a faith in the possibility of something better. It irritates me to be told how things have always been done. I defy the tyranny of precedent. I go for anything new that might improve the past.”

Civil War nurse and founder of the American Red Cross, Clara Barton fully embodies this month’s focus on compassion, faithfulness, and mercy. Her depth of compassion for
others, whether school children, battlefield wounded, or victims of hurricanes and other
disasters has been unmatched. Her own code was uncompromising: “You must never so much as think whether you like it or not, whether it is bearable or not, you must never think of anything except the need and how to meet it.”

A painfully shy girl, Clara grew up in a large family and was schooled mainly by her brothers and sisters. She began her nursing career at home, when one of her brothers fell ill, and she nursed him back to health. For years she taught school, and actually founded two schools – one in North Oxford, Massachusetts, and a second in New Jersey. But she found her life’s work during the Civil War, when her path-breaking service to the wounded on the frontlines earned her the title, “Angel of the Battlefield.” She went on to found the American Red Cross, which unlike its European counterpart, aided in disaster relief as well. A spectacular children’s book on Clara Barton has yet to be written, but read more about the life of this amazing woman.

barton1

 

 

Clara Barton (Rookie Biographies). Will Mara.
Children’s Press, 2003. (K-2)

 

barton2

 

Time for Kids: Clara Barton: Angel of the Battlefield.
Editors of Time Magazine. Collins, 2008 (2-6)

 

 

barton3

 

 

Clara Barton: Founder of the American Red Cross.
(Childhood of Famous Americans
). Augusta Stevenson.
Alladin, 1986. (3-6)

 

barton4

 

 

A Woman of Valor: Clara Barton. Stephen B. Oats.
Free Press, 1995 (Strong middle school readers and up)

Chunky, definitive adult biography of this amazing woman.